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Monday, October 20, 2014

#SurviveAndThrive Blog Hop



 

I’m thrilled to take part in this one-day blog hop. This blogfest is meant to bring awareness of disease prevention and early detection regarding medical conditions that may be averted or treated if caught in the early stages. Our desire is to motivate people to go in for early screening, and if a condition is caught early and treated, then our world just became a little better place to live.

This event is hosted by:

Be sure to stop by their blogs. I hope you will be inspired by their stories and those of the other participants (click here) to take good care of yourself.


I want to tell you why self-examination and mammograms are so important to me and my family. If not for early detection of breast cancer, I might have lost both my sisters and my cousin. One of my sisters is now a twenty-one year survivor. My other sister has been cancer-free for six years. My cousin hasn’t had as easy of a time. She’s also had ovarian and uterine cancer. Still, she’s a survivor.

Until twenty-one years ago,no one in my family had been hit by breast cancer. Then those three all in the same generation. Somehow, I’ve escaped . . . so far. And I’m the oldest. I am so thankful. This year, breast cancer hit the next generation. My niece (my brother's daughter) is going through chemo-therapy. Her cancer was not caught as early as the others. We’re praying that she will not only survive but thrive.

My annual mammogram is scheduled for next week. When is/was yours?

For more information on helping yourself, go to http://www.cancer.org/healthy/morewaysacshelpsyoustaywell/breastcancer



36 comments:

  1. Thanks for posting Diane. Just went in for my annual this morning! Both my sisters are survivors, the eldest just celebrated her 15 yr. She'd just had a mammo several months prior and it was clear then found the lump herself-a very aggressive nasty that gave only a 25% of survival. She beat it. My middle sister had a different type and didn't have chemo several years ago and everything looks good. Don't just trust in the mammo- be aware of any changes in your body! My public service announcement.

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  2. Diane, this is such a worthy reminder. Thanks for posting it. Our youngest daughter is approaching her two-year milestone of being cancer-free. Married and with three young kids at home, she chose to have a double mastectomy even though the tumor was only on one side. She wanted IT all gone! During the surgery, luck - or the grace of God - revealed a second tumor on the opposite side that hadn't been detected by mammo or MRI. She told us her decision was made after lots of prayers. I think those prayers were heard. This year my sister-in-law was diagnosed as well as a dear, dear friend. I urge every woman to do the self-exam and follow with a yearly mammogram. As Nancy said in her post, be aware of any changes in your body. You know your own body better than anyone else. I pray your niece will have many future milestones to count.

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    1. Thanks so much, Loralee. My niece also chose a double mastectomy, which has prolonged her recovery. Like your SIL, they found more cancer that hadn't been detected.

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  3. Thanks for posting, Diane. My paternal grandmother had a mastectomy at 70 years of age, and when she died at age 85, she was found to be cancer free. My first cousin (also on my dad's side) is a five year survivor. I had my mammogram this spring, but as you say, that doesn't always catch things, and the big C can come on quickly.

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    1. Glad you've had your mammogram, Patty. Prayers for your cousin.

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  4. I need to schedule mine. I wanted to get through with the rest of my mess before I moved on to the next body part.

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  5. Breast cancer runs in my family. Even though I'm male, there's still a slight chance for me. But my mother credits her annual mammogram with saving her life.

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    1. Jay, you're right. Most people don't think of men getting breast cancer. I've seen more PSAs about it this month than ever before. Glad to hear mammograms helped you mom.

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  6. My family has been lucky enough to escape the statistics. I'm hoping that lasts a long while.

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  7. Thanks for this, Diane. You are absolutely right. Early screening and just being aware of your own body is so important! A friend of mine, just barely 36, is battling an aggressive breast cancer. On the plus side, they caught it really early so her chances are good. The day she let everyone know, she urged women to do a self-exam regularly. I found myself sitting in my day job office, doing a self exam...which was totally a good idea until I realized my desk was next to the window facing the nearby city park path.

    Oops.

    Still. I did the exam (moved to the bathroom). Every woman should!

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    1. Oh, Alyssa. Hope nobody was in the park. Great that you took your friend's advice. Prayers for her.

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  8. I had problems with my breast when I turned 30. It leaked blood and such. They decided to do tests and finally chose to take a chunk of my breast out, along with the duct. To me, better safe than sorry. They said there was precancerous cells in the duct and so I get my mammogram each year, usually over the summer when I have time. It's like a birthday present to myself.

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    1. Great birthday present. So sorry you had to go through so much.

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  9. I have a mammogram appointment in December. I am in my mid-30s and am getting this done much earlier than most women do. My mom had breast cancer years ago, and thankfully, she is doing fine right now. Nonetheless, all this means I need to be more vigilant.

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    1. Good for you, Cynthia, on scheduling that mammo. So glad your mom is doing fine. Vigilance is the key.

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  10. My thoughts are with your niece and your family. How terrifying that it would spring up in this generation like that.

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    1. Thanks, Shannon. It's important to know your family history. My daughter has been very good about keeping the women in her generation apprised of the breast cancer history. My sister informed our girl cousins about hers 22 years ago. Used to be nobody talked about it. Awareness helps.

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  11. That's heavy and sobering. I'm sorry breast cancer has ruthlessly been attacking your loved ones. It's inspiring that they've all survived. My mammogram is scheduled for November. Thank you, Diane.

    Healthy wishes.

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    1. Healthy wishes to you , too. Thanks for stopping by.

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  12. It is so weird that it was not in your family before? One wonders about what food we eat and what is really in the food. I hope all and especially your niece will thrive until they are at least 95! I have had a mammogram done 2 years ago and all was well and I do self examinations regularily

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    1. Yes, Birgit, we've all thought it was weird. Thanks for the good wishes. Congrats on your taking care of yourself.

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  13. I always go for my mammograms and have been lucky that only a lump was found once in the 1990s, but was benign. I just wish they could come up with a method that was efficient but not painful for many. Perhaps then, so many wouldn't avoid them. Sorry to be coming by late. Had to attend to hubs in the hospital this week with changes, etc.

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    1. Better late than not at all. Hope your hubs is okay.

      I, too, wish mammos weren't so painful--esp. if one has tender breasts. I grit my teeth with each view.

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  15. I'm glad both your sisters and cousin are doing well. Sorry they didn't catch your niece's breast cancer earlier. Sending lots of good thoughts to your niece, and your family.

    Julie

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  16. Hi Diane - I too am glad you and your sisters survived - my thoughts though go to your niece and her family ... it simply cannot be easy for any of them - I pray she is one of the survivors ... Hilary

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  17. Diane, thank you for the reminder. You may be saving a life.

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  18. I feel guilty now!
    Need to schedule my gynae appointment...

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